THE DHAMMAPADA | THE BUDDHA'S PATH OF WISDOM

The Dhammapada is an anthology of Buddhist verses, in actuality the sayings of the Buddha; belonging to the part of the Theravada Pali Canon of scriptures known as the Khuddaka Nikaya, consisting of 423 verses, and is arranged in 26 chapters by topic.

It is one of the most popular and accessible books of Buddhist scripture. Undoubtedly one of the greatest teachers in history, the Buddha has had an immeasurable influence on the human race. He taught that our suffering stems from desire and that the only way to remove desire is to purify the heart. Dhamma means law, discipline, justice, virtue, truth — that which holds things together. Pada means way, path, step, foot. So, The Dhammapada is the path of virtue, or the way of truth.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Chapter   1 - The Twin Verses
Chapter   2 - Awareness
Chapter   3 - Thought
Chapter   4 - Flowers
Chapter   5 - The Fool
Chapter   6 - The Wise Men
Chapter   7 - The Venerable
Chapter   8 - The Thousands
Chapter   9 - Evil
Chapter 10 - Punishment
Chapter 11 - Old Age
Chapter 12 - Self
Chapter 13 - The World
Chapter 14 - The Awakened
Chapter 15 - Happiness
Chapter 16 - Pleasure
Chapter 17 - Anger
Chapter 18 - Impurity
Chapter 19 - The Just
Chapter 20 - The Path
Chapter 21 - Miscellaneous
Chapter 22 - The Downward Course
Chapter 23 - The Elephant
Chapter 24 - Craving
Chapter 25 - The Monk
Chapter 26 - The Holy One

Chapter 1 - The Twin Verses

1-1

All that we are is the result of what we have thought; is founded by our thoughts, is made up of our thoughts. If one speaks or acts with an evil thought, suffering follows one, like the wheel of the cart follows the foot of the ox.

1-2

All that we are is the result of what we have thought, is founded by our thoughts, is made up of our thoughts. If one speaks or acts with a pure thought, happiness follows one, like a shadow that never leaves.

1-3

"They insulted me, they hurt me, they defeated me, they cheated me", - in those who harbor such thoughts, hate will never cease.

1-4

"They insulted me, they hurt me, they defeated me, they cheated me", - in those who do not harbor such thoughts; hate will cease.

1-5

For hate is never conquered by hate. Hate is conquered by love. This is an eternal law.

1-6

The world does not realize that we must all come to an end here; but those who do realize this, end their quarrels at once.

1-7

He who lives looking for pleasures only, his senses uncontrolled, immoderate in his food, idle and weak. Mara (the tempter) will certainly overthrow him, as the wind throws down a weak tree.

1-8

He who lives without looking for pleasures, his senses well-controlled, moderate in his food, faithful and strong. Mara will certainly not overthrow, any more than the wind throws down a rocky mountain.

1-9

Whoever would put on the yellow robe without having cleansed oneself from impurity, disregarding self-control and truth, is not deserving of the yellow robe.

1-10

But whoever has cleansed oneself from impurity, is well grounded in all the virtues, and is possessed of self-control and truth, is deserving of the yellow robe.

1-11

Those who imagine truth in untruth and see untruth in truth never arrive at truth, but follow vain desires.

1-12

Those who know truth as truth and untruth as untruth arrive at truth, and follow true desires.

1-13

As rain make its way into a badly roofed house, so passion make its way into an unreflecting mind.

1-14

As rain does not make its way into a well roofed house, so passion does not make its way into a reflecting mind.

1-15

Wrong-doers grieve in this world, and they grieve in the next; they grieve in both. They grieve and are afflicted when they see the wrong they have done.

1-16

The virtuous find joy in this world, and they find joy in the next; they find joy in both. They find joy and are glad when they see the good they have done.

1-17

Wrong-doers suffer in this world, and they suffer in the next; they suffer in both. They suffer when they think of the wrong they have done. They suffer even more when going on the wrong path.

1-18

The virtuous are happy in this world, and they are happy in the next; they are happy in both. They are happy when they think of the good they have done. They are even happier when going on the right path.

1-19

Even if the thoughtless can recite many of the scriptures, if they do not act accordingly, they are not living the holy life, but are like a cowherd counting the cows of others.

1-20

Even if the faithful can recite only a few of the scriptures, if they act accordingly, having given up passion, hate and folly, being possessed of true knowledge and serenity of mind, craving nothing in this world or the next, they are living the holy life.

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Chapter 2 - Awareness

2-21

Awareness is the path of immortality; thoughtlessness is the path of death. Those who are aware do not die. The thoughtless are as if dead already.

2-22

The wise having clearly understood this, delight in awareness and find joy in the knowledge of the noble ones.

2-23

These wise ones, meditative, preserving, always using strong effort, attain nirvana, the supreme peace and happiness.

2-24

If one is awake, aware, mindful, pure, considerate, self-restrained and lives according to law, one's glory will increase.

2-25

By awakening, by awareness, by restraint and control, the wise may make for oneself an island which no flood can overwhelm.

2-26

Fools follow after vanity, are ignorant and careless. The wise keep awareness as their best treasure.

2-27

Do not follow after vanity nor after sensual pleasure nor lust. Whoever meditates with awareness obtains great joy.

2-28

When the wise conquer thoughtlessness by awareness, climbing the terraced heights of wisdom, free from sadness viewing the sad crowd below; they gaze upon the fools, like one on the mountain peak gazes upon those standing on the plain.

2-29

Aware among the thoughtless, awake among the sleepy, the wise advances like a racehorse leaves behind the slow.

2-30

By awareness Indra rose to become chief of the gods. People praise awareness; thoughtlessness is always blamed.

2-31

A monk who finds joy in awareness, who looks with fear on thoughtlessness, moves about like fire, burning all restrictions, small or large.

2-32

A monk who finds joy in awareness, who looks with fear on thoughtlessness, cannot fall away, but is close to nirvana.

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Chapter 3 - Thought

3-33

As fletchers make their arrows straight, the wise make straight their wavering and unsteady thought, which is difficult to guard and difficult to restrain.

3-34

Like a fish taken from its watery home and thrown on the dry ground, our thought quivers all over in order to escape the dominion of Mara.

3-35

It is good to tame the mind, which is difficult to restrain, fickle, and wandering. A tamed mind brings happiness.

3-36

Let the wise guard their thoughts, which are difficult to perceive, tricky, and wandering. Thoughts well-guarded brings happiness.

3-37

Those who restrain their mind, which travels far alone without a body, and hides in the chamber (of the heart), will be free from the restrictions of death.

3-38

If one's mind is unsteady, if it does not know the true path; if one's peace of mind is troubled, wisdom is not perfected.

3-39

There is no fear for the one whose thought is untroubled, whose mind is not confused; who has ceased to think of good and bad, who is aware.

3-40

Knowing that this body is (fragile like a jar, and making one's thought strong as a fortress, one should attack Mara with the weapon of wisdom, protect what is conquered and stay always aware.

3-41

Before long, unfortunately, this body will lie on the earth, rejected, without consciousness, like a useless log.

3-42

Whatever an enemy may do to an enemy, or hater to a hater, a wrongly directed mind will do greater harm.

3-43

Neither a mother nor a father nor any other relative will do so much; a well-directed mind will do us greater service.

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Chapter 4 - Flowers

4-44

Who shall conquer this world and the world of death and the gods? Who shall find the clear path of truth, as a skillful person finds the flower?

4-45

The wise student will conquer this world and the world of death and the gods. The wise student will find the clear path of truth, as a skillful person finds the flower?

4-46

Whoever knows that this body is like foam and has learned that its nature is a mirage, will break the flourishing arrows of Mara and never see the king of death.

4-47

Death carries off a person who is gathering flowers, whose mind is distracted, like a flood carries off a sleeping village.

4-48

Death subdues a person who is gathering flowers, whose mind is distracted, before one is even satiated in pleasure.

4-49

As the bee collects nectar and departs without harming the flower or its color or scent, so let the sage live in a village.

4-50

Nor the faults of others not their errors of commission or omission, but one's own errors and omissions should the sage consider.

4-51

Like a beautiful flower, full of color, but without scent, are the fine but fruitless words of those who do not act accordingly.

4-52

Like a beautiful flower, full of color and full of scent, are the fine but fruitful words of those who do act accordingly.

4-53

As many kinds of garlands can be made from a heap of flowers, so many good works may be achieved by a mortal after birth.

4-54

The scent of flowers does not travel against the wind, not even that of sandalwood, rose-bay or jasmine, but the fragrance of good people travels even against the wind. A good person pervades everywhere.

4-55

Sandalwood or rose-bay or lotus or jasmine, among these perfumes, the perfume of virtue is unsurpassed.

4-56

Limited is the scent of rose-bay or sandalwood, but the perfume of the virtuous rises up to the gods as the highest.

4-57

Mara never crosses the path of those who are virtuous, who live without thoughtlessness, and who are liberate by true knowledge.

4-58, 59

Just as on a heap of rubbish thrown upon the highway the lotus will grow sweetly fragrant, delighting the soul; thus the wise student of the truly enlightened Buddha shines forth by his wisdom among those who are like rubbish, among the people that walks in darkness.

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Chapter 5 - The Fool

5-60

Long is the night to one who is awake. Long is ten miles to one who is tired. Long is the cycle of birth and death to the fool who does not know the true path.

5-61

If a traveller does not meet with one who is better or equal, let him firmly travel alone; there is no companionship with a fool.

5-62

"These sons belong to me, and this wealth belongs to me"; with such thoughts a fool is tormented. One does not belong to oneself; how much less sons and wealth?

5-63

The fool who knows one's own folly, is wise at least to that extent; but the fool who thinks oneself wise is really a fool.

5-64

If a fool is associated with a wise person all one's life, the fool will not perceive the truth, any more than a spoon will taste the soup.

5-65

If a fool is associated with a wise person all one's life, the fool will not perceive the truth, any more than a spoon will taste the soup.

5-66

Fools of little understanding are their own worst enemies, for they do wrong deeds which bear bitter fruits.

5-67

That action is not well done, which having been done, being remorse, whose result one receives crying with tears.

5-68

But that action is well done, which having been done, does not bring remorse, whose result one receives gladly and cheerfully.

5-69

As long as the wrong action does not bear fruit, the fool thinks it is like honey; but when it bears fruit, then the fool suffers grief.

5-70

Let a fool month after month eat food with the tip of kusha grass; nevertheless one is not worth one-sixteenth of those who have understood the truth.

5-71

A wrong action, like newly drawn milk, does not turn soon; smoldering, like fire covered by ashes, it follows the fool.

5-72

When the wrong action, after it has become known, turns to sorrow for the fool, then it destroys one's brightness and splits the head.

5-73

Let the fool wish for false reputation, for precedence among the monks, for authority in the convents, for veneration among the people.

5-74

"Let both the householders and the monks think that this done by me. Let them always ask me what should be done and what should not be done." Such is the wish of the fool of increasing desire and pride.

5-75

"One road leads to wealth; another road leads to nirvana." Let the monk, the disciple of Buddha, learn this, and not strive for honor but seek wisdom.

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Chapter 6 - The Wise Men

6-76

If you see a wise person who shows you your faults, who shows what is to be avoided, follow that wise person as you would one who reveals hidden treasures; you will be better not worse for following that one.

6-77

Let one admonish; let one teach; let one forbid the wrong; and one will be loved by the good and hated by the bad.

6-78

Do not have wrong-doers for friends; do not have despicable people for friends; have virtuous people for friends; have for friends the best people.

6-79

Whoever drinks in the truth lives happily with a serene mind. The wise are joyful in the truth revealed by the noble ones.

6-80

Engineers of canals guide the water; fletchers make the arrow straight; carpenters shape the wood; the wise mould themselves.

6-81

As a solid rock is not shaken by the wind, so the wise are not shaken by blame and praise.

6-82

As a deep lake is clear and calm, so the wise become tranquil after they listen to the truth.

6-83

Good people walk on regardless of what happens to them. Good people do not dabble on about their desires. Whether touched by happiness or by sorrow, the wise never appear elated or depressed.

6-84

Whoever for one's sake or for another's. does not wish for a son or wealth or power, and if one does not wish for success by unfair means, that one certainly is virtuous, wise and holy.

6-85

Few are those people who reach the farther shore; the other people here run along this shore.

6-86

But those who, when the truth has been taught to them, follow the truth, will pass over the dominion of death, however difficult to cross.

6-87, 88

Leaving behind the path of darkness and following the path of light, let the wise person go from home to a homeless state, in retirement looking for delight in detachment where it seems difficult. Letting go of all pleasures, calling nothing one's own, let the wise cleanse oneself from all the troubles of the mind.

6-89

Those whose minds are well-grounded in the elements of enlightenment, who without clinging to anything find joy in freedom from attachment, whose appetites have been conquered, and who are full of light, they are free in this world.

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Chapter 7 - The Venerable

7-90

There is no suffering for the one who has completed the journey, who is free from sorrow, who has freed oneself on all sides, who has broken all ties.

7-91

The thoughtful exert themselves; they do not delight in a home; like swans who have left their lake, they leave their house and home.

7-92

Those who have no accumulations, who eat properly, who have perceived release and unconditioned freedom, their path is difficult to understand, like that of birds in the sky.

7-93

Those whose passions are stilled, who are indifferent to pleasure, who have perceived release and unconditioned freedom, their path is difficult to understand, like that of birds in the sky.

7-94

Even the gods admire one whose senses are controlled, like horses well-tamed by the driver, who is free from pride and free from appetites.

7-95

Such a dutiful one who is tolerant like the earth, who is firm like a pillar, who is like a lake without mud; no new birth is in store for this one.

7-96

One's thought is calm; calm is one's word and one's action when one has obtained freedom by true knowledge and become peaceful.

7-97

The one who is free from gullibility, who knows the uncreated, who has severed all ties, removed all temptations, renounced all desires, is the greatest of people.

7-98

In a village or in a forest, in a valley or on the hills, wherever the venerable live, that is a place of joy.

7-99

Forests are delightful; where others find no joy, there the desireless will find joy, for they do not seek the pleasures of the senses.

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Chapter 8 - The Thousands

8-100

Better than a thousand meaningless words is one sensible word if hearing it one becomes peaceful.

8-101

Better than a thousand meaningless verses is one sensible verse if hearing it one becomes peaceful.

8-102

Better than reciting a hundred meaningless verses is one verse of Dhamma if hearing it one becomes peaceful.

8-103

If a person were to conquer in battle a thousand times a thousand people, if another conquer oneself, that one is the greatest conqueror.

8-104, 105

Conquering oneself is better than conquering other people; not even a god, a spirit, nor Mara with Brahma, could turn into a defeat the victory of one who always practice the disciple of self-control.

8-106

If a person month after month for a hundred years should sacrifice with a thousand offerings, and if but one moment that person paid reverence to one whose soul is grounded in knowledge, better is that reverence than a hundred years of sacrifices.

8-107

If a person for a hundred years should worship Agni in the forest, and if but one moment that person paid reverence to one whose soul is grounded in knowledge, better is that reverence than a hundred years of worship.

8-108

Whatever a person sacrifices in this world as an offering or as an oblation for a whole year in order to gain merit, the whole of it is not worth a quarter. Reverence shown to the virtuous is better.

8-109

To the one who always reveres and respects the aged, four things increase: life, health, happiness and power.

8-110

Better than a hundred years of living in vice and unrestrained is living one day if a person is virtuous and contemplative.

8-111

Better than a hundred years of living in ignorance and unrestrained is living one day if a person is wise and contemplative.

8-112

Better than a hundred years of living in idleness and weakness is living one day if a person is courageously makes effort.

8-113

Better than a hundred years of not perceiving how things arise and pass away is living one day if a person does perceive how things arise and pass away.

8-114

Better than a hundred years of not perceiving immortality is living one day if a person does perceive immortality.

8-115

Better than a hundred years of not seeing the supreme truth is living one day if a person does see the supreme truth.

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Chapter 9 - Evil

9-116

A person should hurry toward the good and restrain one's thoughts from evil. If a person is slow in doing good, one's mind will find pleasure in wrong.

9-117

If a person does what is evil, let one not do it again. Let one not find pleasure in it. Painful is the accumulation of evil.

9-118

If a person does what is good, let one do it again. Let one find joy in it. Happiness is the result of good conduct.

9-119

Even an evil-doer sees happiness as long as one's evil deed does not ripen; but when the evil deed has ripened, then does the evil-doer see bad.

9-120

Even a good person sees bad as long as one's good action does not ripen; but when one's good action has ripened, then does the good person see the good.

9-121

Let no one underestimate evil, thinking, "It will not come near me". Even a water-pot is filled by the falling of drops of water. A fool becomes full of evil even if one gathers it little by little.

9-122

Let no one underestimate good, thinking, "It will not come near me". Even a water-pot is filled by the falling of drops of water. A wise person becomes full of goodness even if one gathers it little by little.

9-123

Let a person avoid evil actions, as a merchant, who has few companions and carries much wealth, voids a dangerous road; as a person who loves life avoids poison.

9-124

Whoever has no wound one one's hand may touch poison with that hand; poison does not affect one who has no wound; nor does evil one who does no wrong.

9-125

Whoever does evil to an innocent person or to one who is pure and harmless, the evil returns to that fool just like fine dust thrown against the wind.

9-126

Some people are born again in the womb; evil-doers go to hell; the good go to heaven; those free from worldly desires attain nirvana.

9-127

Neither in the sky nor in the middle of the ocean nor by entering the caves of mountains is there known a place on earth where one may escape from the results of evil deeds.

9-128

Neither in the sky nor in the middle of the ocean nor by entering the caves of mountains is there known a place on earth where one will not be overcome by death.

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Chapter 10 - Punishment

10-129

Everyone trembles at punishment; everyone fears death. Likening others to oneself, one should neither kill nor cause killing.

10-130

Everyone trembles at punishment; everyone loves life. Likening others to oneself, one should neither kill nor cause killing.

10-131

Whoever seeking one's own happiness inflicts pain on others who also want happiness will not find happiness after death.

10-132

Whoever seeking one's own happiness does not inflict pain on others who also want happiness will find happiness after death.

10-133

Do not speak anything harsh. Those who are spoken to will answer you. Angry speech is painful and retaliation will touch you.

10-134

If you silence yourself as still as a broken gong, you have attained nirvana, for anger is not known to you.

10-135

Just as a cowherd with a staff drives the cows into the pasture, so does old age and death drive the life of living beings.

10-136

A fool committing evil actions does not know that the stupid person burns through one's own deeds, like one burned by fire.

10-137

Whoever inflicts punishment on those who do not deserve it and offends against those who are without offense soon comes to one of these ten states:

10-138, 140

cruel suffering, infirmity, injury of the body, fearful pain, or mental loss, or persecution from the ruler, or a fearful accusation, loss of relations, or destruction of possessions, or lightning fire burning one's houses, and when one's body is destroyed the fool goes to hell.

10-141

Neither nakedness nor matted hair nor dirt nor fasting nor lying on the ground nor rubbing with dust nor sitting motionless purify a mortal who is not free from doubt and desire.

10-142

Whoever though dressed in fine clothes, live peacefully, is calm, controlled, restrained, pure and does not hurt any other beings, that one is holy, an ascetic, a monk.

10-143

Is there in the world anyone who is so restrained by modesty that they avoid blame like a trained horse avoids the whip?

10-144

Like a trained horse when touched by a whip, by strenuous and eager, and by faith, by virtue, by energy, by meditation, by discernment of the truth you will overcome this great sorrow, perfected in knowledge, behavior and mindfulness.

10-145

Engineers of canals guide the water; fletchers make the arrow straight; carpenters shape the wood; good people mould themselves.

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Chapter 11 - Old Age

11-146

Why is there laughter, why is there joy while this world is always burning? Why do you not seek a light, you who are shrouded in darkness?

11-147

Consider this dress-up lump covered with wounds, joined with limbs, diseased and full of many schemes which are neither permanent nor stable.

11-148

The body is wearing out, a nest of disease and frail; this heap of corruption falls apart; life ends in death.

11-149

What pleasure is there for one who sees these white bones like gourds thrown away in the autumn?

11-150

A fortress is made out of bones, plastered over with flesh and blood, and in it lives old age and death, pride and deceit.

11-151

The glorious chariots of the kings wear out; the body also comes to old age; but the virtue of good people never ages; thus the good teach each other.

11-152

People who have learned little grow old like an ox; their flesh grows, but their knowledge does not grow.

11-153

I have run through a course of many births looking for the maker of this dwelling and did not find it; painful is birth again and again.

11-154

Now you are seen, the builder of the house; you will not build the house again. All your rafters are broken; your ridgepole is destroyed; your mind, set on the attainment of nirvana, has attained the extinction of desires.

11-155

Those who have not practiced proper discipline, who have not acquired wealth in their youth, pine away like old cranes in a lake without fish.

11-156

Those who have not practiced proper discipline, who have not acquired wealth in their youth, lie like broken bows, sighing after the past.

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Chapter 12 - Self

12-157

If a person holds oneself dear, let one watch oneself diligently. The wise should be watchful during any of the three watches of the night.

12-158

Let each person first direct oneself to what is right; then let one teach the others; thus the wise will not suffer.

12-159

If a person makes oneself as one who teaches the others to be, then being well-controlled, that one might guide others, since self-control is difficult.

12-160

Self is the master of self; who else could be the master? With self well-controlled a person finds a master such as few can find.

12-161

The evil done by oneself, born of oneself, produced by oneself, crushes the fool, just as a diamond breaks even a precious stone.

12-162

The one whose vice is great brings oneself down to that condition where one's enemy wishes one to be, just as a creeper overpowers the entangled sala tree.

12-163

Bad actions and actions harmful to ourselves are easy to do; what is beneficial and good, that is very difficult to do.

12-164

The fool who scorns the teaching of the saintly, the noble, and the virtuous, and follows the wrong ideas, bears fruit to one's own destruction, like the fruits of the katthaka reed.

12-165

By oneself is evil done; by oneself one suffers; by oneself is wrong left undone; by oneself is one purified. Purity and impurity come from oneself; no one can purify another.

12-166

Let no one neglect one's own duty for the sake of another's, however great; let one who has discerned one's own duty, be always attentive to this duty.

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Chapter 13 - The World

13-167

Do not follow evil law. Do not live in thoughtlessness. Do not follow wrong ideas. Do not be attached to the world.

13-168

Arise; do not be thoughtless. Follow the path of virtue. The virtuous rest in bliss in this world and in the next.

13-169

Follow the path of virtue; do not follow the wrong path. The virtuous rest in bliss in this world and in the next.

13-170

Look upon the world as a bubble; look on it as a mirage. Whoever looks thus upon the world is not seen by the sovereign of death.

13-171

Come, look at this world resembling a painted royal chariot. The fool are immersed in it, but the wise are not attached to it.

13-172

The one who formerly was thoughtless and afterwards became conscientious lights up this world like the moon when freed from a cloud.

13-173

The one whose wrong actions are eradicated by the good conduct lights up this world like the moon when freed from a cloud.

13-174

This world is blinded; only a few can see here. Like birds escaped from the net, a few go to heaven.

13-175

The swans go on the path of the sun; miraculously they fly through the sky. The wise are led out if this world, when they have conquered Mara and the tempter's armies.

13-176

Whoever violates the one law, who speaks lies and scoffs at another world, there is no wrong that one will not do.

13-177

The uncharitable do not go to the world of the gods; only fools do not praise liberality; the wise find joy in generosity, and because of it become blessed in the other world.

13-178

Better than sovereignty over the earth, better than going to heaven, better than dominion over all the worlds is the reward of the first step of attainment.

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Chapter 14 - The Awakened

14-179

The one whose conquest cannot be conquered again, into whose conquest no one in this world enters, by what track can you lead that one, the Awakened, the omniscient, the trackless?

14-180

The one whom no desire with its snares and poisons can lead astray, by what track can you lead that one, the Awakened, the omniscient, the trackless?

14-181

Even the gods emulate those who are awakened and aware, who are given to meditation, who are wise, and who find joy in the peace of renunciation.

14-182

It is difficult to be born as a human being; difficult is the life of mortals; difficult is the hearing of the true path; difficult is the awakening of enlightenment.

14-183

Not to do evil, to do good, and to purify one's mind; that is the teaching of the Awakened One.

14-184

The Awakened call patience the highest sacrifice; the Awakened declare nirvana the highest good. The one is not a true ascetic who harms others, who oppresses others.

14-185

Not to blame, not to harm, to live restrained under the law, to be moderate in eating, to live alone, and to practice the highest consciousness; this is the teaching of the Awakened One.

14-186

There is no satisfying lusts, even by a shower of gold pieces. Whoever knows that lusts have a short taste and cause pain is wise.

14-187

Even in heavenly pleasures one finds no satisfaction; the disciple who is fully awakened finds joy only in the destruction of all desires.

14-188, 189

Those driven by fear go for refuge to mountains and forests, to sacred groves and shrines. That is not a safe refuge; that is not the best refuge; resorting to such a refuge one is not released from all suffering.

14-190, 191

Whoever takes refuge with the Awakened One, the Truth and the Community, who with clear understanding perceives the Four Noble Truths; namely suffering, the origin of suffering, the cessation of suffering, and the Noble Eightfold Path that leads to cessation of suffering.

14-192

This indeed is the safe refuge; this is the best refuge; having gone to such refuge, one is released from all suffering.

14-193

Those with true vision is not easy to find; they are not born everywhere. Wherever such a sage is born, the people there prosper.

14-194

Blessed is the arising of the Awakened; blessed is the teaching of the Truth; blessed is the harmony of the Community; blessed is the devotion of those who live in peace.

14-195, 196

Whoever gives reverence to those worthy of reverence, whether the Awakened or their disciples, those who have overcome the army and crossed the river of sorrow, whoever gives reverence to such as have found deliverance and are free of fear, their merit cannot be measured by anyone.

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Chapter 15 - Happiness

15-197

Let us live in joy, not hating those who hate us. Among those who hate us, we live free of hate.

15-198

Let us live in happiness, free from disease among those who are diseased. Among those who are diseased, let us live free of disease.

15-199

Let us live in happiness, free from greed among the greedy. Among those who are greedy, we live free of greed.

15-200

Let us live in happiness, though we possess nothing. Let us live feeding on joy, like the bright gods.

15-201

Victory breeds hate, for the conquered is unhappy. Whoever has given up victory and defeat is content and lives happily.

15-202

There is no fire like lust, no misfortune like hate; there is no pain like this body; there is no happiness higher than peace.

15-203

Craving is the worst disease; disharmony is the greatest sorrow. The one who knows this truly knows that nirvana is the highest bliss.

15-204

Health is the greatest gift; contentment is the greatest wealth; trusting is the best relationship; nirvana is the highest bliss.

15-205

Whoever has tasted the sweetness of solitude and tranquility becomes free from fear and sin while drinking the sweetness of the truth.

15-206

The sight of the noble is good; to live with them is always joyful.

15-207

Whoever does not see fools will always be happy. Whoever associates with fools suffers a long time. Being with fools, as with an enemy, is always painful. Being with the wise, like meeting with family, is joyful.

15-208

Therefore, one should follow the wise, the intelligent, the learned, the patient, the dutiful, the noble; one should follow the good and wise, as the moon follows the path of the stars.

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Chapter 16 - Pleasure

16-209

Whoever gives oneself to distractions and does not give oneself to meditation, forgetting true purpose and grasping at pleasure, will eventually envy the one who practices meditation.

16-210

Let no one cling to what is pleasant or unpleasant. Not to see what is pleasant is painful, as it is to see what is unpleasant.

16-211

Therefore do not become attached to anything; loss of what is loved is painful. Those who have neither beloved nor unloved have no bonds.

16-212

From pleasure comes grief; from pleasure comes fear. Whoever is free from pleasure knows neither grief nor fear.

16-213

From attachment comes grief; from attachment comes fear. Whoever is free from attachment knows neither grief nor fear.

16-214

From greed comes grief; from greed comes fear. Whoever is free from greed knows neither grief nor fear.

16-215

From lust comes grief; from lust comes fear. Whoever is free from lust knows neither grief nor fear.

16-216

From craving comes grief; from craving comes fear. Whoever is free from craving knows neither grief nor fear.

16-217

Whoever has virtue and insight, who is just, truthful, and mind one's own business, the world will love.

16-218

The one in whom a desire for the nirvana has arisen, whose mind is satisfied and whose thoughts are free from desires is called one who ascends the enlightenment.

16-219

Family, friends and well-wishers welcome a person who has been away long and returns safely from afar.

16-220

Similarly, one's good actions receive the good person who has gone from this world to the other, as family receive a friend who is returning.

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Chapter 17 - Anger

17-221

Give up anger; renounce pride; transcend all worldly attachments. No sufferings touch the person who is not attached to name and form, who calls nothing one's own.

17-222

Whoever restrains rising anger like a chariot gone astray, that one I call a real driver; others merely hold the reins.

17-223

Overcome anger by love; overcome evil by good; overcome the miserly by generosity, and the liar by truth.

17-224

Speak the truth; do not yield to anger; give even if you only have a little. These three steps lead you to the gods.

17-225

The wise who hurt no one, who always control their body, go to the unchangeable place, where, once they have gone, they suffer no more.

17-226

Those who are always aware, who study day and night, who aspire for nirvana, their passions will come to an end.

17-227

This is an old saying, Atula, not just from today: "They blame the person who is silent; they blame the person who talks too much; they also blame the person who talks in moderation; there is no one on earth who is not blamed."

17-228

There never was, nor ever will be, nor is there now anyone who is always blamed or anyone who is always praised.

17-229

But the one whom the wise discriminate praise continually day after day as without fault, wise, rich in knowledge and virtue.

17-230

Who would dare to blame that person, who is like a gold coin from the Jambu river? That one is praised even by the gods, even by Brahma.

17-231

One should guard against misdeeds caused by body, and one should be restrained in body; giving up evil conduct in body, one should be of good bodily conduct.

17-232

One should guard against misdeeds caused by speech, and one should be restrained in speech; giving up evil conduct in speech, one should be of good conduct in speech.

17-233

One should guard against misdeeds caused by mind, and one should be restrained in mind; giving up evil conduct in mind, one should be of good conduct in mind.

17-234

The wise who restrain their body, who restrain their speech, and the wise who restrain their mind are truly well-restrained.

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Chapter 18 - Impurity

18-235

You are now like a withered leaf; the messengers of death have come near you. You stand at the threshold of your departure; have you made provision for your journey?

18-236

Make yourself an island; work hard; be wise. When your impurities are purged and you are free from guilt, you will enter into the heavenly world of the Noble ones.

18-237

Your life is coming to an end; you are in the presence of death. There is no rest stop on the way and you have made no provision for your journey.

18-238

Make yourself an island; work hard; be wise. When your impurities are purged and you are free from guilt, you will not again enter into birth and old age.

18-239

As smith removes the impurities from silver, so let the wise remove the impurities from oneself one by one, little by little, again and again.

18-240

Just as rust from the iron eats into it though born from itself, so the wrong deeds of the transgressor lead one to the wrong path.

18-241

Dull repetition is the impurity of prayers; lack of repair is the impurity of houses; laziness is the impurity of personal appearance; thoughtlessness is the impurity of the watcher.

18-242

Bad conduct is the impurity of a woman; stinginess is the impurity of the giver; wrong actions are the impurity of this world and the next.

18-243

The worst impurity of all is the impurity of ignorance. monk, throw off that impurity and become free of all impurities.

18-244

Life seems easy for one who is shameless, who is a crowing hero, a mischief-maker, an insulting, impudent and corrupt person.

18-245

But life seems difficult for one who is modest, who always looks for what is pure, who is detached, quiet, clear and intelligent.

18-246, 247

Whoever destroys life, whoever speaks falsely, whoever in this world takes what is not given to them, whoever goes to another person's spouse, and whoever gives oneself to drinking intoxicating liquors, even in this world they dig up their own roots.

18-248

"Know this, O human, that the unrestrained are evil. Do not let greed and wrong-doing bring you long suffering."

18-249

People give according to their faith or according to their pleasure. Thus whoever worries about food and drink given to others will find no peace of mind day or night.

18-250

Whoever destroys that feeling, tearing it out by the root, will truly find peace of mind day and night.

18-251

There is no fire like lust, no chain like hate; there is no net like delusion, no torrent like craving.

18-252

The faults of others are easy to see; our own are difficult to see. A person winnows others' faults like chaff, but hides one's own faults, like a cheater hides bad dice.

18-253

If one is concerned about the faults of others and is always inclined to be offended, one's own faults grow and one is far from removing faults.

18-254

There is no path in the sky; one does not become an ascetic outwardly. People delight in worldly pleasures; the perfected ones are free from worldliness.

18-255

There is no path in the sky; one does not become an ascetic outwardly. No creatures are eternal; the Awakened One are never shaken.

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Chapter 19 - The Just

19-256

Whoever settles a matter by violence is not just. The wise calmly consider what is right and what is wrong.

19-257

Whoever guides others by a procedure that is non-violent and fair is said to be a guardian of truth, wise and just.

19-258

A person is not wise simply because one talks too much. Whoever is patient, free from hate and fear, is said to be wise

19-259

A person is not a supporter of justice simply because one talks much. Even if a person has learned little, whoever discerns justice with the body and does not neglect justice is a supporter of justice.

19-260

A person is not an elder simply because one' head is gray. Age can be ripe, but one may be called 'old in vain'.

19-261

The one in whom there is truth, virtue, non-violence, restraint, moderation, whoever is free from impurity and is wise, may be called an elder.

19-262

Mere talk or beauty of complexion does not make an envious, greedy, dishonest become respectable.

19-263

The one in whom all these are destroyed, torn out by the very root, who is free from hate and is wise, is called respectable.

19-264

Not by a shaven head does one who is undisciplined and speaks falsely become an ascetic. How will one be an ascetic who is full of desire and greed?

19-265

Whoever wholly subdues evil deeds both small and great, is called an ascetic, because of having overcame all evil.

19-266

A person is not a monk simply because one begs from others. Whoever adopts the whole truth is a monk, not the one who adopts only a part.

19-267

Whoever is above good and bad and is chaste, who carefully passes through the world in meditation, is truly called a monk.

19-268, 269

A person does not become a sage by silence, if one is foolish and ignorant; but the wise one, who, holding a scale, takes what is good and avoids what is bad, is a sage for that reason.

19-270

A person is not noble, because one injures living beings. One is called noble, because one does not injure living beings.

19-271

Not only by discipline and vows, not only by much learning, nor by deep concentration nor by sleeping alone do I reach the joy of release which the worldly can not know.

19-272

"monk, do not be confident until you have reached the extinction of impurities."

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Chapter 20 - The Path

20-273

Of all paths the Eightfold Path is the best; of all truths the Four Noble Truths are the best; of all virtues freedom from attachment is the best; of all people the one who see is the best.

20-274

This is the path; there is no other that leads to the purifying of insight. Follow this path and Mara will be confused.

20-275

If follow this path, you will end your suffering. This path was preached by me when I became aware of the removal of the thorns.

20-276

You yourself must make an effort. The perfected ones are only preachers. Those who enter the path and practice meditation are released from the bondage of Mara.

20-277

"All created things are impermanent." Whoever realized this with wisdom transcends pain; this is the clear path.

20-278

"All created things are sorrowful." Whoever realized this with wisdom transcends pain; this is the clear path.

20-279

"All forms are unreal." Whoever realized this with wisdom transcends pain; this is the clear path.

20-280

Whoever does not rise when it is time to rise, who, though young and strong, is lazy, who is weak in will and thought, that lazy and idle person will not find the path of wisdom.

20-281

Mindful of one's speech, restraining well the mind, let one not commit any wrong with one's body. Whoever keeps these three roads of action clear, will make progress on the path taught by the wise.

20-282

Through meditation wisdom is gained; through lack of meditation wisdom is lost. Whoever knows this double path of progress and decline, should place oneself so that wisdom will grow.

20-283

Cut down the forest of desires, not just a tree; danger is in the forest. When you have cut down the forest and its undergrowth, then, monks, you will be free.

20-284

As long as the desire, however small, of a man for women is not destroyed, so long as his mind attached, like a suckling calf is to its mother.

20-285

Cut out the love of self, like an autumn lotus, with your hand. Cherish the path of peace. Nirvana has been shown by the Buddha.

20-286

"Here I shall live in the rain, here in winter and summer." Thus thinks the fool, not thinking of death.

20-287

Death comes and carries off that person who is satisfied with one's children and flocks, whose mind is distracted, like a flood carries off a sleeping village.

20-288

Sons are no help, nor father, nor relatives; for one who is seized by death, there is no safety in family.

20-289

Understanding the meaning of this, the wise and just person should quickly clear the path that leads to Nirvana.

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Chapter 21 - Miscellaneous

21-290

If by giving up a small pleasure, one sees a great pleasure, the wise will let go of the small pleasure and look to the great one.

21-291

Whoever by causing pain to others wishes to obtain pleasure for oneself, being entangled in the bonds of hate, is not free from hate.

21-292

By neglecting what should be done and doing what should not be done, the desires of the unrestrained and careless increase.

21-293

But those whose awareness is always alert to the body, who do not follow what should not be done, who firmly do what should be done, the desires of such aware and wise people come to an end.

21-294

A holy person goes unscathed, though having killed father and mother and two noble kings and destroyed a kingdom with all its subjects.

21-295

A holy person goes unscathed, though having killed father and mother and two holy kings and an eminent person also.

21-296

The disciples of Gautama are always well awake; their thought is always, day and night, set on the Buddha.

21-297

The disciples of Gautama are always well awake; their thought is always, day and night, set on the Truth.

21-298

The disciples of Gautama are always well awake; their thought is always, day and night, set on the Community.

21-299

The disciples of Gautama are always well awake; their mind is always, day and night, set on the body.

21-300

The disciples of Gautama are always well awake; their mind, day and night, finds joy in abstaining from harm.

21-301

The disciples of Gautama are always well awake; their mind, day and night,finds joy in meditation.

21-302

It is hard to leave the world as a recluse and hard to enjoy the world. It is also hard to live at home as a householder. Living with the unsympathetic is painful. The life of a wanderer is painful. Thus, do not be a wanderer and be free of suffering.

21-303

A person of faith, who is virtuous, well-known and successful, is respected wherever one may be.

21-304

Good people shine from far away, like the Himalaya mountains, but the bad are not seen, like arrows shot at night.

21-305

Whoever can sit alone, rest alone, act alone without being lazy and control oneself alone will find joy in the solitude of the forest.

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Chapter 22 - The Downward Course

22-306

Whoever says, "what is not" goes to hell, also whoever having done something says, "I did not do it." After death both are equal, being people with wrong actions in the next existence.

22-307

Many who wear the yellow robe are ill-behaved and unrestrained. Such wrong-doers by their wrong actions go to hell.

22-308

It would be better for an immoral, unrestrained person to swallow a ball of red-hot iron than to live off the charity of people.

22-309

Four misfortunes befall a careless man who commits adultery: a bad reputation, disturbed sleep, thirdly blame and finally hell.

22-310

There is fault and the wrong path; there is brief pleasure of the frightened in the arms of the frightened, and heavy penalty from the ruler. Thus, let no man run after another's wife.

22-311

As a blade of grass wrongly handled cuts the hand, so also asceticism wrongly practiced leads to hell.

22-312

An careless act performed, a broken vow, unwilling obedience to discipline - all these bring no great reward.

22-313

If anything is to be done, let one do it vigorously. A careless recluse only scatters oneself with the dust of desires.

22-314

A wrong action is better left undone, for a wrong action causes suffering later. A good action is better done, for it does not cause suffering.

22-315

Like a frontier fort that is well-guarded inside and outside, so guard yourself. Not a moment should escape, for those who allow the right moment to pass suffer pain when they are in hell.

22-316

Those who are ashamed of what they should not be ashamed of and are not ashamed of what they should be ashamed of, such people, following false doctrines, enter the wrong path.

22-317

Those who are fear of what they should not fear and do not fear what they should fear, such people, following false doctrines, enter the wrong path.

22-318

Those who discern wrong where there is no wrong and see nothing wrong in what is wrong, such people, following false doctrines, enter the wrong path.

22-319

Those who discern wrong as wrong and what is right as right, such people, following true doctrines, enter the right path.

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Chapter 23 - The Elephant

23-320

I shall endure painful words as the elephant in battle endures arrows shot from the bow; for most people are ill-natured.

23-321

They lead a tamed elephant into a battle; the king mounts a tamed elephant. The tamed are the best people who endures patiently painful words.

23-322

Mules are good, if tamed, and noble Sindhu horses and elephants with large tusks; whoever subdues oneself is better still.

23-323

For with these animals no one reaches the untrodden country where a tamed person goes on one's own tamed nature.

23-324

The elephant called Dhanapalaka is hard to control when his temples are running with pungent sap. He does not eat a morsel when bound; the elephant longs for the elephant grove.

23-325

If one becomes lazy and a glutton, rolling oneself about in gross sleep, like a hog fed on grains, that fool is born again and again.

23-326

This mind of mine used to wander as it liked, as it desired, as it pleased. I shall now control it thoroughly, as the rider holding the hook controls the elephant in rut.

23-327

Do not be thoughtless; watch your thoughts. Extricate yourself from the wrong path, like an elephant sunk in the mud.

23-328

If you find an intelligent companion who will walk with you, who lives wisely, soberly, overcoming all dangers, walk with that person in joy and thoughtfulness.

23-329

If you find an no intelligent companion who will walk with you, who lives wisely and soberly, walk alone like a king who has renounced a conquered kingdom or like an elephant in the forest.

23-330

It is better to live alone; there is no companionship with a fool. Let one walk alone with few wishes, committing no evil, like an elephant in the forest.

23-331

Companions are pleasant when an occasion arises; sharing enjoyment is pleasant. At the hour of death it is pleasant to have done good. The giving up of all sorrow is pleasant.

23-332

Motherhood is pleasant in this world; so is fatherhood. Being an ascetic is pleasant; so is being a holy person.

23-333

Virtue lasting to old age is pleasant; faith firmly rooted is pleasant; attainment of wisdom is pleasant; avoiding evil is pleasant.

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Chapter 24 - Craving

24-334

The craving of a thoughtless person grows like a creeper. That one runs from life to life, like a monkey seeking fruit in the forest.

24-335

Whoever is overcome by this fierce poisonous craving in this world has one's sufferings increase like the spreading birana grass.

24-336

Whoever overcome this fierce craving, difficult to control in this world, sufferings fall off, like water drops from a lotus leaf.

24-337

This beneficial word I tell you, "Do you as many as are gathered here, dig up the root of craving, as one digs up the birana grass to find the usira root, so that Mara may not destroy you again and again, just as the river crushes the reeds."

24-338

As a tree, even though it has been cut down, grows again if its root is strong and undamaged, similarly if the roots of craving are not destroyed, this suffering returns again and again.

24-339

The one whose thirty-six streams (of craving) are flowing strongly towards pleasures of sense, whose thoughts are set on desires, the waves carry away that misguided person.

24-340

The streams flow everywhere; the creeper of craving keeps springing up. If you see that creeper springing up, cut its root by means of wisdom.

24-341

The pleasures of creatures are wide-ranging and extravagant. Embracing those pleasures and holding on to them, they undergo birth and decay again and again.

24-342

Driven by lust, people run around like a hunted hare; bound in chains they suffer for a long time again and again.

24-343

Driven by lust, people run around like a hunted hare; therefore let the monks wishing to conquer lust shake off one's own craving.

24-344

Whoever having got rid of the forest of desires, gives oneself over to that forest-life (of asceticism), and who, when free from desires runs back into it, look at that person, though free, running back into that very bondage.

24-345

Wise people do not call that a strong chain which is made of iron, wood, or rope, stronger is the attachment to jewelry, sons and a wife.

24-346

Wise people call strong this chain which drags down, yields and is difficult to undo; after having cut this, people renounce the world, free from cares, leaving pleasures of sense behind.

24-347

Those who are slaves to desires follow the stream, as spider the web it has made for itself. Wise people when they have cut this, go on free from care leaving all sorrow behind.

24-348

Give up what is in front (the future); give up what is behind (the past); give up what is in the middle (the present), crossing to the farther shore of existence. When your mind is completely free, you will not gain return to birth and old age.

24-349

If a person is not disturbed by doubts, full of strong desires, and yearning for what is pleasurable, craving will grow more and more and one makes one's chains stronger.

24-350

Whoever finds joy in subduing one's thoughts, always reflecting, dwelling on what is not pleasurable, will certainly remove and cut the chains of death.

24-351

Whoever has reached the goal, who is fearless, who is without craving and without wrong, has broken the thorns of existence; this body will be their last.

24-352

Whoever is without craving, without greed, who understands the words and their meanings, who knows the order of letters is called a great sage, a great person. This is their last body.

24-353

"I have conquered all; I know all; in all conditions of life I am free from impurity. I have renounce all, and with the destruction of craving I am free. Having learned myself, whom shall I indicate as teacher?"

24-354

The gift of Truth surpasses all gifts; the sweetness of the Truth surpasses all sweetness; the joy in the Truth surpasses all pleasures; the destruction of craving overcomes all sorrows.

24-355

Riches destroy the foolish, not those who seek beyond. By craving for riches the fool destroys oneself, as one destroys others.

24-356

Weeds harm the fields; lust harms humanity; offerings given to those free from lust bring great reward.

24-357

Weeds harm the fields; hate harms humanity; offerings given to those free from hate bring great reward.

24-358

Weeds harm the fields; vanity harms humanity; offerings given to those free from vanity bring great reward.

24-359

Weeds harm the fields; desire harms humanity; offerings given to those free from desire bring great reward.

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Chapter 25 - The Monk

25-360

Control of the eye is good; good is control of the ear; control of the nose is good; good is control of the tongue.

25-361

Control of the body is good; good is control of speech; control of the thought is good; good is control of all things. A monk who controls all things is freed from sorrow.

25-362

Whoever controls one's hand, whoever controls one's feet, whoever controls one's speech, whoever is well-controlled, whoever finds inner joy, who is collected, who is alone and content they call a Monk.

25-363

The monk who controls one's tongue, who speaks wisely and calmly, who is not proud, who illuminates the meaning of the Truth, that one's words are sweet.

25-364

Whoever lives in the Truth, who finds joy in the Truth, meditates on the Truth, follows the Truth, that monk does not fall away from the Truth.

25-365

Let one not despise what one has received nor envy others. A monk who envies others does not find peace.

25-366

A monk, who, though receiving little, does not despise what one has received, even the gods praise, if one's life is pure and not lazy.

25-367

Whoever never identifies with name and form and whoever does not grieve from not having anything is called a monk.

25-368

The monk who lives in friendliness with confidence in the doctrine of the Buddha will find peace, the blessed place where existence ends.

25-369

Empty the boat, monk; when emptied it will go quickly. Having cut off desire and hate, you will go to freedom.

25-370

Cut off the five; get rid of the five; master the five. A monk who has freed oneself from the five chains is called "one who has crossed the flood."

25-371

Meditate, monk; do not be careless. Do not think of pleasures so that you may not for your carelessness have to swallow the iron ball, lest you cry out when burning, "This is painful!"

25-372

There is no meditation for one without wisdom, no wisdom for one without meditation; whoever has both wisdom and meditation is close to nirvana.

25-373

A monk who with a peaceful heart has entered an empty house, has more than human joy when seeing the Truth clearly.

25-374

When one has comprehend the origin and destruction of the elements of the body, one finds happiness and joy which belong to those who know the eternal.

25-375

This is the beginning here for a wise monk: control of the senses, contentment, living according to the moral law, associating with friends who are noble, pure and not lazy.

25-376

Let one live in love; let one be adept in one's duties; then joyfully one will see the end of sorrow.

25-377

As the jasmine sheds its withered flowers, one should shed desire and hate, monk.

25-378

A monk is said to be calm who has a calm body, calm speech and a calm mind, who has mastered oneself and rejected the baits of the world.

25-379

Lift up your self by yourself; examine your self by yourself. Thus self-protected and attentive you will live joyfully, monk.

25-380

For self is the master of self; self is the refuge of self, therefore tame yourself, like a merchant tames a noble horse.

25-381

Joyful and faithful in the doctrine of the Buddha, the monk finds peace, the joy of ending natural existence.

25-382

Whoever, even as a young monk, applies oneself to the path of the Buddha illuminates this world, like the moon when free from clouds.

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Chapter 26 - The Holy One

26-383

Cut off the stream energetically, holy one; leave desires behind. Knowing the destruction of all that is created, you know the uncreated, holy one.

26-384

When the holy one has reached the other shore in meditation and contemplation, all bonds vanish for the one who knows.

26-385

For the one I call holy one there is neither this shore nor that shore nor both, who is free from fear and free from chains.

26-386

The one I call holy one is thoughtful, detached, settled, accomplished, desireless and has attained the highest goal.

26-387

The sun shines by day; the moon lights up the night; the warriors shine in their armor; the holy one shines in meditation; but the Awakened shines radiantly all day and night.

26-388

Because one has put aside wrong, one is called holy. Because one lives serenely, one is called an ascetic. Because one gets rid impurities, one is called a pilgrim.

26-389

No one should hurt a holy one, but no holy one should strike back. Woe to the one who hurts a holy one; more woe to the one who strikes back.

26-390

It is no small gain to a holy one if one holds one's mind back from the pleasures of life. The sooner the wish to injures disappears, the sooner all suffering will stop.

26-391

The one I call holy one does not hurt by body, speech or mind, and is controlled in these three things.

26-392

Whoever has understood the law of justice as taught by the well Awakened One, should revere the teacher, as priest worships the sacrificial fire.

26-393

Nor by the matted hair, nor by lineage, nor by caste does one become holy. One is holy in whom there is truth and virtue; that one is blessed.

26-394

What is the use of matted hair, fool? What is the use of clothes of goat-skins? Inside you are full of craving; the outside you make clean.

26-395

The one I call holy one wears thrown-away clothes, is lean with veins showing and meditates alone in the forest.

26-396

I do not call one holy one because of one's family or mother. If one has property, one is called superior. The one I call holy one is free of property and all attachment.

26-397

The one I call holy one has cut all chains, never trembles, has passed beyond attachments and is independent.

26-398

The one I call holy one has cut the strap (of craving), the thong (of hatred), and the chain (of false views) with all their encumbrances, has removed the bar (ignorance) and is awakened.

26-399

The one I call holy one, though having committed no offense, patiently bears reproach, ill-treatment and imprisonment, has endurance for one's force and strength for one's army.

26-400

The one I call holy one is free from anger, faithful to vows, virtuous, free from lust, controlled and has received one's last body.

26-401

The one I call holy one does not cling to pleasures, like water on a lotus leaf or a mustard seed on the point of a needle.

26-402

The one I call holy one even here knows the end of suffering, has laid down one's burden and is detached.

26-403

The one I call holy one has deep wisdom and knowledge, discern the right way and the wrong and has attained the highest end.

26-404

The one I call holy one keeps away from both householders and the homeless, rarely visits houses and has few desires.

26-405

The one I call holy one does not hurt any creatures, weak or strong and neither kills nor causes death.

26-406

The one I call holy is tolerant with the intolerant, peaceful with the violent and free from greed among the greedy.

26-407

The one I call holy one has let go of anger, hate, pride and hypocrisy, like mustard seed falls from the point of a needle.

26-408

The one I call holy one speaks true words that are useful and not harsh so that no one is offended.

26-409

The one I call holy one does not take anything in the world that is not given one, be it long or short, small or large, good or bad.

26-410

The one I call holy one has no desires for this world or the next, is free from desires and is independent.

26-411

The one I call holy one has no longings, in knowledge is free from doubt and has reached the depth of the eternal.

26-412

The one I call holy one has passed beyond the attachments of good and bad, is free from sorrow, free from desire, free from impurity.

26-413

The one I call holy one is bright like the moon, pure, serene, undisturbed, in whom pleasure is extinguished.

26-414

The one I call holy one has gone beyond this muddy road of rebirth and delusion, so difficult to pass, has crossed over and reached the other shore, is thoughtful, not agitated, nor doubting, not attached, and calm.

26-415

The one I call holy one in this world, giving up all desires, travels around without a home, in whom all desire for existence is extinguished.

26-416

The one I call holy one in this world, giving up all craving, travels around without a home, in whom all craving for existence is extinguished.

26-417

The one I call holy one, letting go of attachment to humans, rises above the attachment to gods, and is independent from all attachments.

26-418

The one I call holy one gives up what is pleasurable and what is not pleasurable, is cool and free from any seeds of renewal, the hero who has conquered all the worlds.

26-419

The one I call holy one knows the destruction and the return of beings everywhere, is free from attachment, living well, and is awakened.

26-420

The one I call holy one, whose path is not known by gods nor spirits nor humans, whose desires are extinct, is a saint.

26-421

The one I call holy calls nothing one's own, whether it be in front, behind, or between, is poor and free from attachment.

26-422

The one I call holy one is fearless, noble, heroic, all-wise, ever-pure, all-conquering, has accomplished the goal and is awakened.

26-423

The one I call holy one knows one's former lives, perceives heaven and hell, has reached the end of birth, is a sage whose knowledge is perfect, having accomplished complete perfection.

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